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Meta Treks: A Star Trek Philosophy Podcast

Meta Treks is a Trek.fm podcast dedicated to a deep examination of the philosophical ideas found in Star Trek. In each episode, Zachary Fruhling and Mike Morrison take you on a fascinating journey into the inner workings of Star Trek storytelling, deeper into subspace than you've ever traveled before.
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Meta Treks: A Star Trek Philosophy Podcast
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Jul 2, 2018

The Original Series Season 1 - Essential Trek Philosophy.  

The entire Star Trek franchise, with over 700 television episodes and 13 feature films (to date), owes its existence to the strength of season 1 of Star Trek: The Original Series. If season 1 hadn't been as strong as it was, we wouldn't have the Star Trek franchise we know and love today. Season 1 of The Original Series isn't just strong dramatically, however. It is also strong philosophically, episode by episode exploring abstract ideas, future human potential, and the human condition.  

In this episode of Meta Treks, hosts Mike Morrison and Zachary Fruhling go back to where it all began in a discussion of their top picks for Essential Trek Philosophy from season 1 of Star Trek: The Original Series. Join Mike and Zachary as they discuss the four dominant philosophical themes in the premiere season of Star Trek: ethical and moral dilemmas, transhumanism and future human potential, the internal struggle of conflicting human natures, and the ethics of war.  

Chapters 
Intro (00:01:19) 
Initial Thoughts on TOS Season One (00:01:58) 
The Four Main Philosophical Themes (00:10:26) 
Moral Choices and Ethical Conundrums (00:14:54) 
The City on the Edge of Forever (00:15:07) 
Transhumanism (00:21:13) 
The Cage (00:22:24) 
Arena (00:26:28) 
Errand of Mercy (00:28:11) 
The Return of the Archons (00:33:39) 
Space Seed (00:37:47) 
Where No Man Has Gone Before (00:39:52) 
Charlie X/The Squire of Gothos (00:40:30) 
What Are Little Girls Made Of? (00:42:32) 
Miri (00:46:13) 
Dagger of the Mind (0047:31) 
Exploration of Human Nature (00:50:49) 
The Enemy Within (00:52:06) 
The Conscience of the King (00:56:21) 
The Alternative Factor (00:58:03) 
Ethics of War (01:03:48) 
Balance of Terror (01:04:33) 
A Taste of Armageddon (01:06:14) 
This Side of Paradise (01:08:35) 
Devil in the Dark (01:11:38) 
Recap and Final Thoughts (01:15:08) 
Closing (01:18:31)  

Hosts 
Mike Morrison and Zachary Fruhling  

Production 
Mike Morrison (Editor) Zachary Fruhling (Producer) C Bryan Jones (Executive Producer) Matthew Rushing (Executive Producer) Ken Tripp (Executive Producer) Patrick Devlin (Associate Producer) Kay Shaw (Associate Producer) Mark Walker (Associate Producer) Norman C. Lao (Associate Producer) Richard Marquez (Production Manager) Brandon-Shea Mutala (Patreon Manager)

May 28, 2018

Philosophical Themes in "These Are the Voyages."  

In this episode of Meta Treks, hosts Zachary Fruhling and Mike Morrison explore the philosophical themes in the series finale of Star Trek: Enterprise, "These Are the Voyages." While "These Are the Voyages" remains controversial with fans of Enterprise because of the focus on Commander Riker and Counselor Troi aboard the Enterprise-D, "These Are the Voyages" had the weighty task of book-ending 18 continuous years of Star Trek on television, from 1987 with the premier of Star Trek: The Next Generation to 2005 with the finale of Star Trek: Enterprise. From finding meaning and answers to life's biggest questions in historical events, to ethical conundrums involving conflicting duties, Zachary and Mike give a philosophical valentine to the underappreciated "These Are the Voyages."  

Chapters 
Intro (00:01:20) 
Plot Problems and Interesting Philosophy (00:08:25) 
The Hermeneutical Question (00:15:25) 
Recreating the Past and Finding Meaning (00:23:04) 
Commander Riker and Conflicting Duties (00:35:40) 
Kant, Truth, and Consequences (00:41:49) 
Open Source Information vs. Closed Access (00:53:54) 
Perspective Through Interpersonal Stories (01:02:21) 
The Value and Weight of History (01:11:17) 
Closing (01:18:45) 

Hosts 
Zachary Fruhling and Mike Morrison  

Production 
Mike Morrison (Editor) Zachary Fruhling (Producer) C Bryan Jones (Executive Producer) Matthew Rushing (Executive Producer) Ken Tripp (Executive Producer) Patrick Devlin (Associate Producer) Kay Shaw (Associate Producer) Mark Walker (Associate Producer) Norman C. Lao (Associate Producer) Richard Marquez (Production Manager) Brandon-Shea Mutala (Patreon Manager)

Apr 23, 2018

Good vs. Evil in Star Trek.  

We generally understand the meaning of "good," whether in the sense of following the rules or in the sense of minimizing the suffering of others. But, paradoxically, we understand the nature of "evil" to a far lesser degree. While Star Trek tends to shy away from making strict moral judgments, opting instead to humanize its villains by explaining the psychological motivations for their actions or the roots of those actions in past experiences, Star Trek does, however, explore the nature of evil in characters such as Armus from "Skin of Evil" (Star Trek: The Next Generation), the Borg Queen (Star Trek: First Contact; Star Trek: Voyager), and the Pah-Wraiths (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine).  

In this episode of Meta Treks, hosts Mike Morrison and Zachary Fruhling discuss "good versus evil" in the Star Trek universe. Are these supposedly evil characters are truly evil, or are they off the hook because of their backgrounds and their respective sob stories?  

Chapters 
Intro (00:01:19) 
Initial Thoughts on Good and Evil (00:03:17) 
Pah-Wraiths and Evil in DS9 (00:08:43) 
False Dichotomies and Defining Characteristics of Evil (00:11:25) 
Enter Armus from "Skin of Evil" (00:18:09) 
Comparing Evil in Star Trek to Evil in Theology (00:28:52) 
The Borg as a Candidate for Evil (00:38:00) 
The Borg Queen vs. The Pah-Wraiths (00:50:39) 
Nietzsche and the Judaeo Concept of Evil (00:56:41) 
Khaaaan! (01:05:51) 
Final Thoughts (01:13:52) 
Closing (01:27:02)  

Hosts 
Mike Morrison and Zachary Fruhling  

Production 
Mike Morrison (Editor) Zachary Fruhling (Producer) C Bryan Jones (Executive Producer) Matthew Rushing (Executive Producer) Ken Tripp (Executive Producer) Patrick Devlin (Associate Producer) Kay Shaw (Associate Producer) Mark Walker (Associate Producer) Norman C. Lao (Associate Producer) Richard Marquez (Production Manager) Brandon-Shea Mutala (Patreon Manager)

Apr 10, 2018

The Visitor.  

In this episode of Meta Treks, hosts Zachary Fruhling and Mike Morrison discuss the philosophical themes in the fourth-season Deep Space Nine episode, "The Visitor." Inspired by Jake Sisko's passion for writing, Zachary and Mike discuss the relationship between creative writing, lived experience, and what the German philosopher Martin Heidegger called "Being-in-the-World." Zachary and Mike also discuss "The Visitor" as a phenomenological metaphor for various aspects of human experience, including interpersonal connection, parenthood, regret, aging, and the lifelong quest to rediscover one's true self.  

Chapters 
Intro (00:01:20) 
Initial Thoughts about DS9 "The Visitor" (00:02:46) 
Heidegger and "In-der-Weld-Sein" (00:03:44) 
Life Observed vs. Life Lived (00:10:39) 
Unresolved Moments in Time (00:18:29) 
Phenomenology of Human Experience (00:26:32) 
Metaphysical Personal Connection (00:30:16) 
Self-Sacrifice and Cutting the Cord (00:47:00) 
Experience and Change Over Time (00:51:43) 
The Old Defiant Crew Out of Mothballs (01:03:17) 
Final Thoughts (01:05:51) 
Closing (01:12:56)  

Hosts 
Zachary Fruhling and Mike Morrison  

Production 
Mike Morrison (Editor) Zachary Fruhling (Producer) C Bryan Jones (Executive Producer) Matthew Rushing (Executive Producer) Ken Tripp (Executive Producer) Patrick Devlin (Associate Producer) Kay Shaw (Associate Producer) Mark Walker (Associate Producer) Norman C. Lao (Associate Producer) Richard Marquez (Production Manager) Brandon-Shea Mutala (Patreon Manager)

Mar 21, 2018

TNG Season 5 - Essential Trek Philosophy.  

In this episode of Meta Treks, hosts Mike Morrison and Zachary Fruhling compare their top picks for Essential Trek Philosophy from season 5 of Star Trek: The Next Generation. From transhumanism and a positive spin on genetic engineering in "The Masterpiece Society" to the philosophy of language and an exploration of non-referential language in "Darmok," season five contains some of the philosophically richest episodes in all of Star Trek: The Next Generation. Mike and Zachary also discuss Kantian ethics versus consequentialism in "I, Borg" and medical ethics in the aptly named episode "Ethics," in addition to the unique explorations of the metaphysics of time and the ethics of time travel in "Cause and Effect" and "A Matter of Time."  


Chapters 
Intro (00:01:20) 
The Masterpiece Society (00:06:15) 
Darmok (00:20:03) 
I, Borg (00:47:31) 
Cause and Effect (00:55:37) 
A Matter of Time (01:01:39) 
Conundrum (01:06:59) 
Ethics (01:10:33) 
Closing (01:20:43)  

Hosts 
Mike Morrison and Zachary Fruhling  

Production 
Mike Morrison (Editor) Zachary Fruhling (Producer) C Bryan Jones (Executive Producer) Matthew Rushing (Executive Producer) Ken Tripp (Executive Producer) Patrick Devlin (Associate Producer) Kay Shaw (Associate Producer) Mark Walker (Associate Producer) Norman C. Lao (Associate Producer) Richard Marquez (Production Manager) Brandon-Shea Mutala (Patreon Manager)

Mar 12, 2018

The Conscience of the King.  

To what extent does a person remain morally responsible for his or her actions over time, even after many years or after changes in character and experience? Can people ever change who they fundamentally are inside, or do they merely become better actors playing different roles?  

In "The Conscience of the King" (Star Trek: The Original Series, Season 1), Captain Kirk suspects the 23rd-Century Shakespearean actor Anton Karidian of actually being the (believed-deceased) former governor of Earth colony Tarsus IV, Kodos "The Executioner," notorious for having executed over 4,000 people. Is Karidian really Kodos after all? And if so, is Karidian now a different person, in a moral sense, than the person he used to be? Or is Kodos "The Executioner" still there just beneath the surface and under the guise of Karidian the actor?  

In this episode of Meta Treks, hosts Zachary Fruhling and Mike Morrison discuss the philosophical themes of moral responsibility and personal identity over time in "The Conscience of the King," including the inspired use of theater-acting and masks as metaphors for personal transformation, or perhaps the lack thereof.  

Chapters 
Intro (00:01:20) 
Initial Thoughts about "The Conscience of the King" (00:02:30) 
Morality and Identity Over Time (00:10:31) 
Radical Conversion, Paul the Apostle, and Identity (00:16:31) 
The Sins of the Father: Lenore Karidian (00:24:26) 
Caesar of the Stars (00:26:46) 
Kodos and Eugenics (00:32:18) 
Not Very Human (00:41:03) 
Truman on Trial (00:51:29) 
Guilt and Culpability (00:57:10) 
Riley and Revenge (01:00:25) 
Closing (01:14:29)  

Hosts 
Zachary Fruhling and Mike Morrison  

Production 
Mike Morrison (Editor) Zachary Fruhling (Producer) C Bryan Jones (Executive Producer) Matthew Rushing (Executive Producer) Ken Tripp (Executive Producer) Patrick Devlin (Associate Producer) Kay Shaw (Associate Producer) Mark Walker (Associate Producer) Norman C. Lao (Associate Producer) Richard Marquez (Production Manager) Brandon-Shea Mutala (Patreon Manager)

Mar 5, 2018

Drone Warfare and "The Arsenal of Freedom."  

When the Enterprise is sent to the Lorenz Cluster in search of the missing U.S.S. Drake, the crew gets drawn into a life-and-death game of cat and mouse with the demonstration model of an ancient automated weapon system, including increasingly powerful and adaptive autonomous sentry probes. While the concept of automated drone warfare may have been closer to science and military fiction in the late 1980s during the first season of Star Trek: The Next Generation, the philosophical ethical issues related to automated warfare in "The Arsenal of Freedom" are even more relevant today.  

In this episode of Meta Treks, hosts Mike Morrison and Zachary Fruhling discuss "The Arsenal of Freedom" (Star Trek: The Next Generation, Season 1), from the commodification of war within the military industrial complex to the pros and cons of peace through superior firepower. Mike and Zachary also discuss the distinction between genuine artificial intelligence and machine learning algorithms.  

Chapters 
Intro (00:01:20) 
Initial Thoughts on "The Arsenal of Freedom" (00:02:44) 
Star Trek and Reagan-Era Warfare (00:09:14) 
Data as The Terminator (00:14:31) 
TNG and Virtues of Drone Warfare (00:20:03) 
Peace Through Superior Firepower (00:27:49) 
The Commodification of War (00:41:41) 
Is Technology Morally Neutral? (00:50:58) 
Algorithms vs. Artificial Intelligence (00:56:23) 
Failsafe Failures (01:07:34) 
Geordi and His First Command (01:16:03) 
Dr. Crusher, Medicine Woman (01:25:37) 
Closing (01:34:04)  

Hosts 
Mike Morrison and Zachary Fruhling  

Production 
Mike Morrison (Editor) Zachary Fruhling (Producer) C Bryan Jones (Executive Producer) Matthew Rushing (Executive Producer) Ken Tripp (Executive Producer) Patrick Devlin (Associate Producer) Kay Shaw (Associate Producer) Mark Walker (Associate Producer) Norman C. Lao (Associate Producer) Richard Marquez (Production Manager) Brandon-Shea Mutala (Patreon Manager)

Oct 30, 2017

Vulcan Katras and the Mind-Body Problem.  

Episode 6 of Star Trek: Discovery, "Lethe," explored and expanded upon the metaphysics of Vulcan katras beyond what had been seen in previous iterations of Star Trek. But what exactly is a Vulcan katra and what properties does it have? From transferring consciousness from one Vulcan to another, to enabling a form of disembodied immortality, katras play an important role in Vulcan mysticism and metaphysics.  

In this episode of Meta Treks, hosts Zachary Fruhling and Mike Morrison give a philosophical analysis of the metaphysics of Vulcan katras in relation to the mind-body problem. Is the katra a type of nonphysical substance, as Cartesian dualism would hold? Is the katra a biophysical or emergent property of the brain and its functioning? And is transferring one's katra, through a mind meld or otherwise, an actual transfer of consciousness to a new location, or is it more like backing up a copy of your hard drive to the cloud?  

Chapters 
Intro (00:01:20) 
"Lethe" and Sciencing the Katra in Discovery (00:04:29) 
Naturalizing the Katra and Alternative Theories (00:10:59) 
Examples of Katric Transfers in Star Trek (00:15:52) 
Are Katras Necessarily Dualist? (00:20:24) 
Is the Katra Living Consciousness? (00:27:57) 
Emerging Consciousness from Katra and Body (00:36:58) 
Is a Katra Divisible Into Parts? (00:48:48) 
What Happens to the Disembodied Katra? (00:55:17) 
Vulcan Immortality and Gnostic Knowledge (01:01:25) 
Touch Telepathy vs. Mind Meld by Remote (01:12:34) 
Closing (01:19:29)  

Hosts 
Zachary Fruhling and Mike Morrison  

Production 
Mike Morrison (Editor) Zachary Fruhling (Producer) C Bryan Jones (Executive Producer) Matthew Rushing (Executive Producer) Ken Tripp (Executive Producer) Patrick Devlin (Associate Producer) Kay Shaw (Associate Producer) Mark Walker (Associate Producer) Norman C. Lao (Associate Producer) Richard Marquez (Production Manager) Brandon-Shea Mutala (Patreon Manager)

Oct 23, 2017

Deep Space Nine Season 5 - Essential Trek Philosophy.  

When people think of ethics in Star Trek, they often think primarily of ethical dilemmas, such as balancing the greater good of one group of people with the greater good of another group of people, or juxtaposing the rights of particular individuals with the common good. But season 5 of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine takes a different approach to its exploration of ethics, using dramatic situations to explore not merely ethical dilemmas, but also ethically praiseworthy or blameworthy character traits of various Starfleet and non-Starfleet characters.  


In this episode of Meta Treks, hosts Mike Morrison and Zachary Fruhling compare their choices for Essential Trek Philosophy from season 5 of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. From the virtuous character traits of loyalty and fortitude in "The Ascent" to the ethics of genetic engineering in "Dr. Bashir, I Presume?", season 5 of Deep Space Nineuses conflict with the Dominion, the Klingons, and the Maquis, to explore the ethical status of various character traits while under pressure, and in a state of political and military conflict.  


Chapters 
Intro and Initial Thoughts on DS9 Season 5 (00:01:20) 
Children of Time (00:09:26) 
...Nor the Battle to the Strong (00:14:27) 
Let He Who Is Without Sin (00:28:41) 
The Ascent (00:39:10) 
The Ship (00:44:29) 
The Begotten (00:53:41) 
Dr. Bashir, I Presume? (01:00:05) 
Honorable Mentions (01:16:38) 
Recap and Final Thoughts (01:21:18) 
Closing (01:24:50)  

Hosts 
Mike Morrison and Zachary Fruhling  

Production 
Mike Morrison (Editor) Zachary Fruhling (Producer) C Bryan Jones (Executive Producer) Matthew Rushing (Executive Producer) Ken Tripp (Executive Producer) Patrick Devlin (Associate Producer) Kay Shaw (Associate Producer) Mark Walker (Associate Producer) Norman C. Lao (Associate Producer) Richard Marquez (Production Manager) Brandon-Shea Mutala (Patreon Manager)

Oct 9, 2017

The Philosophy of Color in Star Trek.  

Star Trek: The Original Series is a colorful show, known for its striking set decorations and bold costuming, from the orange highlights on the Enterprise bridge to the primary colors of the Original Series uniforms, including the uniforms of the infamous Redshirts. But what exactly does it mean for a uniform to be red? Is redness a physical property of the uniform itself, or is redness an aspect of subjective mental experience for whomever observes the uniform? Can the uniform's color be reduced to its more basic physical properties or the basic properties of light itself (frequency, wavelength, and so on), or is color a fundamental part of reality, unable to be reduced to other physical properties? And does the property of "redness" exist as an abstract entity (similar to numbers or other abstract objects), or does color exist only in particular form within individual colorful objects like individual red uniforms?  

In this episode of Meta Treks, hosts Zachary Fruhling and Mike Morrison discuss the philosophy of color in the Star Trek universe. From the physics of light to the physiology of color perception, and from concrete examples to the ontology of abstract entities, Zachary and Mike examine why physics and physiology struggle to give a fully adequate account of the existence and nature of color.

Chapters 
Intro (0001:20) 
Is There a Philosophical Problem? (00:02:47) 
Why Is the Red Shirt Red? (00:07:19) 
Color Physicalism and the "Mystique" of Color Perception (00:18:19) 
Abstract Entities (00:27:04) 
A Red Shirt By Any Other Name (00:32:33) 
The Inverted Spectrum Thought Experiment (00:35:18) 
Color as an Emergent Property (00:44:20) 
Color Primitivism (00:46:57) 
Color Qualia (00:50:53) 
Color Fictionalism (00:52:41) 
Final Thoughts (01:00:52) 
Closing (01:07:39)  

Hosts 
Zachary Fruhling and Mike Morrison  

Production 
Mike Morrison (Editor) Zachary Fruhling (Producer) C Bryan Jones (Executive Producer) Matthew Rushing (Executive Producer) Ken Tripp (Executive Producer) Patrick Devlin (Associate Producer) Kay Shaw (Associate Producer) Mark Walker (Associate Producer) Norman C. Lao (Associate Producer) Richard Marquez (Production Manager) Brandon-Shea Mutala (Patreon Manager)

Oct 2, 2017

Philosophical Themes in Star Trek: Discovery, Episodes 1 and 2.   

Every Star Trek television series is a mirror, reflecting and illuminating the moral dilemmas and the political issues of its time. The premier episodes of Star Trek: Discovery, "The Vulcan Hello" and "Battle at the Binary Stars," are no exception. While it is still too early to know yet what Star Trek: Discovery will eventually become, and the ongoing relevance it will have as current events unfold, it is possible, at least tentatively, to identify several philosophical and political themes. From the nature of leadership and political unity, to the gamesmanship of war in a state of mutual distrust, to race relations across political borders, Star Trek: Discovery boldly goes into the social and political unknown, providing 23rd-century commentary on our 21st-century world.  


In this episode of Meta Treks, hosts Mike Morrison and Zachary Fruhling, fresh on the heels of the premier of Star Trek: Discovery, discuss their tentative interpretations of the philosophical and allegorical themes in "The Vulcan Hello" and "Battle at the Binary Stars."  

Chapters 
Intro (00:01:20) 
Initial Thoughts About Star Trek: Discovery (00:06:16) 
Analogous Ideas and Hermeneutical Interpretation (00:11:20) 
Comparing Klingons (00:16:22) 
Preemptive War and the Hobbesian State of Nature (00:20:13) 
Klingon Messianic Restorationist (00:30:56) 
Nationalism vs. Multiculturalism (00:40:10) 
Touchstones to TOS, ENT, and Kelvin Movies (00:50:49) 
Michael Burnham and the Traumatic Chain (00:58:56) 
Striking Balance Between Emotion and Logic (01:05:25) 
The Contrasting Ethics of Captains (01:12:59) 
Geopolitical Diversity (01:16:05) 
Final Thoughts (01:25:19) 
Closing (01:31:59) 

Hosts 
Mike Morrison and Zachary Fruhling  

Production 
Mike Morrison (Editor) Zachary Fruhling (Producer) C Bryan Jones (Executive Producer) Matthew Rushing (Executive Producer) Ken Tripp (Executive Producer) Patrick Devlin (Associate Producer) Kay Shaw (Associate Producer) Mark Walker (Associate Producer) Norman C. Lao (Associate Producer) Richard Marquez (Production Manager) Brandon-Shea Mutala (Patreon Manager)

Sep 25, 2017

Property Ownership in Star Trek.  

There may be no money in the 24th century, at least not as we know it. And humankind may no longer be driven by the acquisition of material wealth. But what exactly do you do if you want to own one of those extra-special limited-vintage bottles of Chateau Picard?


In this episode of Meta Treks, hosts Zachary Fruhling and Mike Morrison discuss the philosophy and economics of property ownership in Star Trek. What role does property ownership play in a post-scarcity, post-monetary society? And is individual property ownership at odds with the values of 24th-century Federation society?  


Chapters 
Intro (00:01:27) 
Initial Thoughts on the Concept of Property Ownership (00:2:18) 
The Tension Between the Post-Monetary Worldview in Star Trek and the Concept of Property Ownership (00:05:03) 
Sentimental Property in "The Measure of a Man" (00:12:22) 
Property Ownership in the History of Philosophy (00:17:13) 
Religion and the Economic Principle of Scarcity (00:23:54) 
24th Century Barter System (00:35:03) 
Three Interpretations of the Scarcity Problem in Star Trek (00:44:55) 
Property Ownership Disputes (00:52:06) 
Theft of Property in the Future (00:56:28) 
Self-Ownership and Self-Determination (01:03:19) 
Responsible Pet Owners in the 23rd Century (01:10:00) 
Ownership vs. Stewardship (01:14:36) 
Final Thoughts (01:18:41) 
Closing (01:22:28)  

Hosts 
Zachary Fruhling and Mike Morrison  

Production 
Mike Morrison (Editor) Zachary Fruhling (Producer) C Bryan Jones (Executive Producer) Matthew Rushing (Executive Producer) Ken Tripp (Executive Producer) Patrick Devlin (Associate Producer) Kay Shaw (Associate Producer) Mark Walker (Associate Producer) Norman C. Lao (Associate Producer) Richard Marquez (Production Manager) Brandon-Shea Mutala (Patreon Manager)  

Aug 14, 2017

Voyager Season 5 - Essential Trek Philosophy.

If you've ever had the urge to replicate yourself some curtains when faced with a late-night existential crisis, then the fifth-season opener of Star Trek: Voyager, "Night" is for you! In "Night" we see perhaps the best example of ennui (boredom) in all of Star Trek, including some guilt-laden soul searching from Captain Janeway.

But an existential crisis alone does not a season of Star Trek make. And Voyager season 5 is also filled with various ethical dilemmas juxtaposing utilitarian concern for the greater good with respect for the rights of individuals.

In this episode of Meta Treks, hosts Mike Morrison and Zachary Fruhling compare their recommendations for Essential Trek Philosophy from season 5 of Star Trek: Voyager, from the rights and potential of a souped-up 29th century Borg in "Drone" to balancing the best of the past with the possibilities for the future in "11:59."

Chapters
Intro (00:01:19)
Initial Thoughts on Voyager Season 5 (00:05:14)
Night (00:09:08)
Timeless (00:18:56)
Drone (00:29:44)
Thirty Days (00:35:48)
Nothing Human (00:50:21)
Think Tank (00:56:33)
Equinox Part 1 (01:06:47)
Latent Image (01:08:51)
11:59 (01:16:06)
Final Thoughts (01:23:41)
Closing (01:28:53)

Hosts
Mike Morrison and Zachary Fruhling

Production
Mike Morrison (Editor) Zachary Fruhling (Producer) C Bryan Jones (Executive Producer) Matthew Rushing (Executive Producer) Ken Tripp (Executive Producer) Patrick Devlin (Associate Producer) Kay Shaw (Associate Producer ) Mark Walker (Associate Producer) Norman C. Lao (Associate Producer) Richard Marquez (Production Manager) Brandon-Shea Mutala (Patreon Manager)

Jul 31, 2017
Star Trek Philosophy of Education.  

An advanced future civilization such as the United Federation of Planets would surely have an equally advanced educational system. After all, we are told in Star Trek: The Next Generation that 24th century schoolchildren learn calculus in grade school aboard the Enterprise! But other than an accelerated math curriculum, what are the defining characteristics of the educational system and the philosophy of education within in the Star Trek universe?  

In this episode of Meta Treks, hosts Zachary Fruhling and Mike Morrison discuss 24th century philosophy of education. From Wesley Crusher's Starfleet Academy entrance exam and future educational technology, to issues of multiculturalism and pluralism in education aboard Deep Space Nine, Zachary and Mike go back to school for a refresher course on all things education in the Star Trek universe.  

Be sure to listen carefully! There will be a quiz afterward, proctored of course by Quark's alternate-timeline schoolteacher avatar from the Deep Space Nine episode "Children of Time"!  

Chapters 
Intro (00:01:20) 
Education Improves Over Time (00:05:32) 
The Role of Technology in Education (00:07:42) 
Starfleet Academy vs. Civilian Education (00:10:13) 
"Samaritan Snare" - Specialization vs. General Education (00:13:10) 
24th Century Life-Hacking - The Meaning of Life Won't Be on the Exam (00:17:10) 
Scrubbing Plasma Conduits - Work Ethic, Dirty Jobs, and Intrinsic/Extrinsic Rewards (00:21:27) 
Setting a High Bar and Taking Ownership (00:33:18) 
Educational Simulations and Learning by Doing - Acting Ensign Wesley Crusher (00:37:33) 
Competing Worldviews and Multicultural Education on Deep Space Nine (00:44:59) 
Star Trek EdTech (01:01:12) 
Like Magic - Educational and Technological Utopianism (01:12:08) 
24th Century Homeschooling - Educational Introverts and Extroverts (01:14:29) 
Final Thoughts (01:22:43) 
Closing (01:34:00)  

Hosts 
Zachary Fruhling and Mike Morrison  

Production 
Mike Morrison (Editor) Zachary Fruhling (Producer) C Bryan Jones (Executive Producer) Matthew Rushing (Executive Producer) Ken Tripp (Executive Producer) Patrick Devlin (Associate Producer) Kay Shaw (Associate Producer) Norman C. Lao (Associate Producer) Richard Marquez (Production Manager) Brandon-Shea Mutala (Patreon Manager)  
Jul 17, 2017
Narratives and Metanarratives in Star Trek.  

Throughout Western history, grand narratives, or metanarratives, have been used to define who we are and where we should be going as a people. These metanarratives have included things like the Enlightenment, the Scientific RevolutionDemocracyMarxismEmancipation, and many other competing metanarratives that have made up the tapestry of Western civilization.  

Star Trek, likewise, has its grand metanarratives, which tie together individual stories and narratives into a unified message about the future potential of humankind. These Star Trek metanarratives include things like technological progresspolitical unificationeliminating economic scarcity, and so on. But having seen the collapse of many of these grand narratives of Western civilization, or at least their dark underbellies, many people in today's postmodern times now take a skeptical view, or even a cynical one, about the plausibility of these idealistic grand metanarratives.  

In this episode of Meta Treks, hosts Mike Morrison and Zachary Fruhling, discuss the use of narratives and metanarratives in Star Trek, addressing the fundamental question of whether Star Trek's grand narratives will end up on the same ash heap of history as other discarded metanarratives of Western civilization, or whether the grand narratives of the Star Trek worldview have the staying power to persist into the 24th century and beyond.  

Chapters 
Intro (00:01:20) 
Distinguishing Between "Narratives" and "Metanarratives" in Star Trek (00:05:08) 
Collapse of the Grand Narratives of the Western World (00:12:08) 
Star Trek Snake Oil (00:14:57) 
The Power of Oratory - Motivating Change with Metanarratives (00:24:47) 
TNG "The Neutral Zone" - Timeless Ideals vs. Contemporary Metanarratives (00:32:08) 
The Importance of Critical Skepticism (00:45:23) 
DS9 "The Storyteller" - Telling a Great Story (00:50:58) 
TNG "The Inner Light" - Appeals to the Heart (00:57:28) 
Cultural Apathy - Working for the Weekend vs. Working for the Future (01:03:15) 
Non-Reductive Perspectivism - Embracing Grand Narratives (01:08:25) 
Hero of Your Own Story - The Center Seat vs. Scrubbing Plasma Conduits (01:13:24) 
Final Thoughts (01:20:12) 
Closing (01:29:53)  

Hosts 
Mike Morrison and Zachary Fruhling  

Production 
Mike Morrison (Editor) Zachary Fruhling (Producer) C Bryan Jones (Executive Producer) Matthew Rushing (Executive Producer) Ken Tripp (Executive Producer) Patrick Devlin (Associate Producer) Kay Shaw (Associate Producer) Richard Marquez (Production Manager) Brandon-Shea Mutala (Patreon Manager)  
Jul 3, 2017
Pen Pals.  

When Lt. Commander Data contacts a girl named "Sarjenka" from a pre-warp civilization in distress on his 24th-century space ham radio, it leads to a super-secret philosophical discussion about the nature of the Prime Directive in Captain Picard's quarters. Should the Prime Directive be interpreted strictly or loosely? How should Starfleet officers weigh the high-stakes, life-or-death consequences for an entire civilization against their responsibility and oath to uphold the Prime Directive? Would interpreting Sarjenka's "whisper in the dark" as a formal request for help count as "sophistry," as Captain Picard claims? And what role do friendships and emotions play in determining moral obligation in light of the Prime Directive?  

In this episode of Meta Treks, hosts Zachary Fruhling and Mike Morrison discuss the second-season episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation, "Pen Pals." But this is episode 73 of Meta Treks, and the number 73 has a very special meaning in Morse code in ham radio circles: "Best regards." Because Zachary himself has been a third-generation licensed ham radio operator since he was just a tad older than Sarjenka, this episode of Meta Treks debates the role and responsibilities of radio communication in the Star Trek universe, whether that newfangled subspace radio or good old-fashioned RF. Zachary and Mike also discuss Wesley Crusher's first command and what it means to have "command presence."  

Chapters 
Intro (00:01:35) 
Initial Thought on Pen Pals from TNG Season 2 (00:03:29) 
The Ham Radio Connection (00:07:50) 
Unusually High Stakes and the Philosophical Debate (00:17:14) 
"Obligations that go beyond duty..." (00:22:05) 
The Individual Positions of the Crew in the Debate (00:25:43) 
Worf Takes the Kantian Position (00:27:01) 
Picard's Argument for Causal Determinism (0029:59) 
Line Drawing Problem (00:35:28) 
Making the Decision: Command Presence and the Nature of Command (00:42:10) 
Principles vs. Consequences (00:49:07) 
Wesley's First Command (00:50:57) 
Riker's Advice: What Would Picard Do (00:59:17) 
Regulation and Communication (01:00:29) 
Subspace QSL Cards and Q Codes (01:03:31) 
Closing (01:07:33)  

Hosts 
Zachary Fruhling and Mike Morrison  

Production 
Mike Morrison (Editor) Zachary Fruhling (Producer) C Bryan Jones (Executive Producer) Matthew Rushing (Executive Producer) Ken Tripp (Executive Producer) Patrick Devlin (Associate Producer) Kay Shaw (Associate Producer) Richard Marquez (Production Manager) Brandon-Shea Mutala (Patreon Manager)
Jun 26, 2017
Enterprise Season 2 - Essential Trek Philosophy. 

Season 2 of Enterprise contained numerous fun and interesting and science-fiction concepts and ideas, as the crew of the NX-01 encountered novelty and adventure going where no humans had ever gone before. But this season also explored a number of important philosophical and ethical issues, from the Kantian principle of not using other sentient beings as a means to your own ends in "Dead Stop" to the politics of gender and sexual identity in "Stigma." 

In this episode of Meta Treks, hosts Mike Morrison and Zachary Fruhling recount their choices for Essential Trek Philosophy from season 2 of Enterprise, along with proverbial life lessons learned from this season, such as the importance of getting down in the trenches with people who are struggling, standing up to bullies, and going the extra mile (or the extra light year) to rebuild damaged relationships. 

Chapters 
Intro (00:01:21)
Essential Enterprise: Season 2 (00:09:08)
Dead Stop (00:11:04)
Stigma (00:22:22)
A Night in Sickbay (00:34:25)
Cogenitor (00:47:31)
Marauders (01:01:28)
Dawn (01:07:49)
The Crossing (01:12:33)
Horizon and First Flight (01:18:19)
Minefield, The Communicator, and Carbon Creek (01:23:13)
Recap and Final Thoughts (01:32:14)
Closing (01:33:24) 

Hosts
Mike Morrison and Zachary Fruhling 

Production
Mike Morrison (Editor) Zachary Fruhling (Producer) C Bryan Jones (Executive Producer) Matthew Rushing (Executive Producer) Ken Tripp (Executive Producer) Patrick Devlin (Associate Producer) Kay Shaw (Associate Producer) Richard Marquez (Production Manager) Brandon-Shea Mutala (Patreon Manager) 
Jun 12, 2017
Future Human Cultural Evolution with Patrick Devlin.  

In the Star Trek universe, the cultural progression of alien races is remarkably deterministic, as cultures proceed from their own versions of the stone age, to the bronze age, to the industrial age, and culminating in warp-capable civilizations that are fully fledged members of the galactic community.  

But what reasons do we have for thinking that our own diverse human cultures will progress along the path laid out for us in the Star Trek universe? What are the different possible trajectories of future human cultural evolution? And what are the different causal factors that produce cultural change over time (societal, political, technological, or otherwise)?  

In this episode of Meta Treks, hosts Zachary Fruhling and Mike Morrison are joined by Meta Treks associate producer Patrick Devlin to discuss future human cultural evolution, both inside the Star Trek universe and in our own world today.  

Chapters 
Intro (00:02:12) 
Welcome to Patrick Devlin and Initial Thoughts (00:01:20) 
Is Cultural Evolution Predictable? (00:02:06) 
Ebbs and Flows (00:10:39) 
Possible Trajectories (00:14:13) 
Mechanisms for Cultural Change (00:25:20) 
"Blink of an Eye" and Cultural Progress (00:28:56) 
Thought Bubbles (00:36:52) 
Death is the Best Invention of Life (00:39:18) 
Vulcans and the Struggles of Reason (00:40:22) 
The Ba'ku and Post-Warp Society (00:47:22) 
From Consumers to Makers (00:50:52) 
External Change vs. Internal Change (01:03:31) 
Final Thoughts (01:10:56) 
Closing (01:22:39)  

Hosts 
Zachary Fruhling and Mike Morrison  

Guest 
Patrick Devlin  

Production 
Mike Morrison (Editor) Zachary Fruhling (Producer) C Bryan Jones (Executive Producer) Matthew Rushing (Executive Producer) Ken Tripp (Executive Producer) Patrick Devlin (Associate Producer) Kay Shaw (Associate Producer) Richard Marquez (Production Manager) Brandon-Shea Mutala (Patreon Manager)
Jun 5, 2017
Cardassian Virtue Ethics.  

Throughout the Star Trek universe, the various alien races serve as a mirror for the best and the worst of our own human natures, and the Cardassians are no exception. But which character traits do the Cardassians find most virtuous? And which characters in the Star Trek universe are the best candidates for the ideal or most virtuous Cardassians, based on the unique character traits that Cardassians themselves recognize as virtues?  

In this episode of Meta Treks, hosts Mike Morrison and Zachary Fruhling discuss Cardassian virtue ethics and what we can learn about ourselves from a look into Cardassian culture.  

Chapters 
Intro (00:01:21) 
Cardassian Virtue Ethics (00:04:22) 
Next Generation Cardassians vs. DS9 Cardassians (00:12:11) 
Body Language and Projecting Values (00:18:14) 
The Cardassian Übermensch (00:29:37) 
Tribunal and the Ethics of the Cardassian State (00:35:08) 
Industrial Design as a Reflection of Cardassian Values (00:48:50) 
Self Sacrifice vs. Self Service and The Philosopher-King Paradox (00:57:32) 
The Hero of His Own Story (01:07:35) 
Final Thoughts (01:08:28) 
Closing (01:15:20)  

Hosts 
Mike Morrison and Zachary Fruhling  

Production 
Mike Morrison (Editor) Zachary Fruhling (Producer) C Bryan Jones (Executive Producer) Matthew Rushing (Executive Producer) Ken Tripp (Executive Producer) Patrick Devlin (Associate Producer) Kay Shaw (Associate Producer) Richard Marquez (Production Manager) Brandon-Shea Mutala (Patreon Manager)
May 29, 2017
"Rapture" and Altered States of Consciousness. 

On the eve of Bajor's admittance into the Federation, an accident in one of Quark's holosuites results in the synapses being hyper-stimulated in Captain Sisko's brain. Captain Sisko enters a heightened state of awareness allowing him to locate the legendary Bajoran lost city of B'hala.  

In this episode of Meta Treks, hosts Zachary Fruhling and Mike Morrison discuss the philosophical themes and concepts in the fifth-season Deep Space Nine episode "Rapture." From duck-rabbit Gestalt shifts to ineffable, private moments of clarity and insight, Zachary and Mike explore the the relationship between perception, knowledge, and altered states of consciousness.  

Touching on other themes in "Rapture," Zachary and Mike also discuss the ethics of medical intervention and the therapeutic role of faith in healing and well-being. Finally, Zachary and Mike explore the political pros and cons of the Bajorans joining the Federation, when faced with re-surging Cardassian activity and Dominion aggression in the Alpha Quadrant.  

Chapters 
Intro: DS9's Rapture (00:01:08)
Gestalt Shifts and the Potential of the Human Brain (00:05:35)
A Moment of Clarity (00:16:37)
Timothy Leary and Altered States of Consciousness (00:20:33)
Ethics of Medical Intervention (00:27:38)
Faith in Faith (00:35:33)
The Power of Positive Thinking and Mr. Rozhenko's Neighborhood (00:39:43)
Sisko and a Sympathetic Winn (00:46:19)
Bajor's Entry Into The Federation (00:49:02)
The Benefits and Defining Traits of Bajorans (00:59:27)
Final Thoughts on Rapture (01:03:35)
Closing (01:10:55) 

Hosts
Zachary Fruhling and Mike Morrison 

Production
Mike Morrison (Editor) Zachary Fruhling (Producer) C Bryan Jones (Executive Producer) Matthew Rushing (Executive Producer) Ken Tripp (Executive Producer) Patrick Devlin (Associate Producer) Kay Shaw (Associate Producer) Kit Loffstadt (Associate Producer) Richard Marquez (Production Manager) Brandon-Shea Mutala (Patreon Manager)
May 22, 2017
The Original Series Season 2 - Essential Trek Philosophy. 

Season 2 of Star Trek: The Original Series playfully explores human nature, what human nature is and what it could become, its place in the cosmos, and its relation to humanity's past, present, and future. From future Space Nazis in "Patterns of Force" to ancient Greek gods and Roman gladiators in space ("Who Mourns for Adonais?" and "Bread and Circuses"), TOS season 2 explores the best and the worst of human nature across the whole of human history. We also see the crew of the U.S.S. Enterprise debate ethical questions about our relation to the unknown, from giant space amoebas in "The Immunity Syndrome" to the mystical powers of Korob and Sylvia in "Catspaw," along with the iterative development of one the defining concepts of the Star Trek universe, the noninterference principle known as "The Prime Directive." 

In this episode of Meta Treks, hosts Mike Morrison and Zachary Fruhling continue their philosophical retrospective of every season of Star Trek, discussing their top choices for "Essential Trek Philosophy" from season 2 of Star Trek: The Original Series.  

Chapters 
Intro (00:01:08)
Amok Time (00:12:57)
Metamorphosis (00:14:29)
A Private Little War (00:18:32)
The Omega Glory (00:23:26)
Patterns of Force (00:31:31)
The Immunity Syndrome (00:36:19)
Return to Tomorrow (00:41:31)
The Deadly Years (00:46:20)
The Apple (00:51:32)
The Changeling and The Ultimate Computer (00:53:30)
By Any Other Name (01:02:26)
Who Mourns for Adonais? (01:07:33)
Bread and Circuses (01:21:11)
Closing (00:00:00) 
 
Hosts
Mike Morrison and Zachary Fruhling 
 
Production
Mike Morrison (Editor) Zachary Fruhling (Producer) C Bryan Jones (Executive Producer) Matthew Rushing (Executive Producer) Ken Tripp (Executive Producer) Patrick Devlin (Associate Producer) Kay Shaw (Associate Producer) Kit Loffstadt (Associate Producer) Richard Marquez (Production Manager) Brandon-Shea Mutala (Patreon Manager) 
May 8, 2017

Kierkegaard and Stages on Life's Way.  

This time, we're talking "Soren," but not Dr. Tolian Soren from Star Trek Generations; we're talking about the Danish philosopher Søren Kierkegaard! Søren Kierkegaard is well-known for his "Stages on Life's Way," or three different approaches to life: the aesthetic approach (novelty, adventure, and experiences); the ethical approach (rules, duty, and responsibility), and the religious approach (sincere commitment, meaningful dedication, and authentic leaps of faith). In this episode of Meta Treks, hosts Zachary Fruhling and Mike Morrison discuss characters from the Star Trek universe that exemplify these three different modes of living.  

Chapters 
Welcome to Episode 67 (00:01:07) 
Søren Kierkegaard and Dr. Soren from Generations (00:03:16) 
Programming an Authentic Life (00:14:24) 
Kierkegaard's Stages of Life's Way (00:22:15) 
The Aesthetic Stage or The Commander Riker Stage (00:31:30) 
The Ethical Stage or The Lieutenant Worf Stage (00:49:50) 
The Religious Stage or The Chief O'Brien Stage (01:07:39) 
Final Thoughts (01:24:51)  

Hosts 
Zachary Fruhling and Mike Morrison  

Production 
Mike Morrison (Editor) Zachary Fruhling (Producer) Matthew Rushing (Executive Producer) Ken Tripp (Executive Producer) C Bryan Jones (Executive Producer) Patrick Devlin (Associate Producer) Kay Shaw (Associate Producer) Kit Loffstadt (Associate Producer) Richard Marquez (Production Manager) Brandon-Shea Mutala (Patreon Manager)  

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Apr 24, 2017

Exploration and Expanding Knowledge.  

The worldview depicted in the Star Trek universe is grounded in the assumption that the pursuit of increased knowledge is intrinsically valuable, such that it is worth the risks and dangers inherent to exploration of the unknown. In this episode of Meta Treks, hosts Mike Morrison and Zachary Fruhling examine this underlying assumption of the Star Trek universe: Does knowledge have intrinsic value or merely instrumental value? What ethical and practical constraints should be placed on the pursuit of knowledge? Should all knowledge be open-source and publicly available, or are some forms of knowledge tainted by having been achieved through ethically questionable methods? Join Mike and Zachary as they explore and expose the hidden tensions in the pursuit of knowledge and of the exploration of the unknown in the Star Trek universe.  

Chapters 
Welcome to Episode 66 (00:01:07) 
The Intrinsic Value of Knowledge as the Underlying Assumption of the Star Trek Universe (00:06:18) 
Intrinsic Value vs. Instrumental Value (00:08:56) 
The Risks of Exploration (00:15:10) 
Starship Captains and Chutzpah (00:22:05) 
Species Authenticity - The Rational Animal (00:23:46) 
Ethical Constraints on the Intrinsic Value of Exploration (00:34:13) 
Tainted Knowledge vs. Open-Source Knowledge (00:39:54) 
Gnosticism and The Omega Directive  (00:45:00) 
Essential Attributes vs. Non-Essential Attributes (00:52:35) 
The Unknown - We Don't Know What We Don't Know (01:07:07) 
Science without Scientism (01:14:47) 
Final Thoughts (01:17:47)  

Hosts 
Mike Morrison and Zachary Fruhling  

Production 
Mike Morrison (Editor) Zachary Fruhling (Producer) Matthew Rushing (Executive Producer) Ken Tripp (Executive Producer) C Bryan Jones (Executive Producer) Patrick Devlin (Associate Producer) Kay Shaw (Associate Producer) Kit Loffstadt (Associate Producer) Richard Marquez (Production Manager) Brandon-Shea Mutala (Patreon Manager)  

Send us your feedback! 
Twitter: @trekfm 
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Contact Form: http://www.trek.fm/contact 
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Apr 17, 2017

"Birthright," Parts I and II. 

In the sixth-season episodes of Star Trek: The Next Generation, "Birthright," Parts I and II, there are parallels between Lieutenant Worf and the Ancient Greek philosopher Socrates. Both Worf and Socrates were accused of corrupting the minds of the youth, both were protesting the perceived injustices and irrationality of the established state, and both were sentenced to death by execution (a fate escaped by Worf more successfully than by Socrates!). 

In this episode of Meta Treks, hosts Zachary Fruhling and Mike Morrison discuss the similarities and dissimilarities of Worf and Socrates. Had Worf been successfully executed, would Worf have been remembered in future Klingon history as a martyr and as the founder of a new Klingon philosophical movement, Worfism (and eventually neo-Worfism), emphasizing the ideal form of the Klingon Empire? 

In addition, Zachary and Mike discuss ancestral and cultural identity, both in the galactic melting pot of the Star Trek universe and in our globalized society here in the real world. Finally, not forgetting the subplot of the emergence of Lt. Commander Data's newfound ability to dream, Zachary and Mike discuss the role and significance of dreams and mythology in a modern, progressive, scientific, and rationalistic society.  

Chapters 
Welcome to Episode 65 (00:01:06) 
Worf and Socrates (00:03:08) 
Worf the Martyr and Neo-Worfism (00:10:56) 
Slavery, Melting Pots, and Cultural Identity (00:28:13) 
Fatherless Data and Worf - Identity and Meaning (00:37:10) 
Klingon Beatnik - "Hey, Mr. Bat'leth Man, Slay a Targ for Me" (00:48:48) 
Modernity, Dreams, and Mythology (00:56:11) 
Cosplay and Choosing Your Own Identity (01:07:44) 
Final Thoughts (01:11:10)  

Hosts 
Zachary Fruhling and Mike Morrison  

Production 
Mike Morrison (Editor) Zachary Fruhling (Producer) Matthew Rushing (Executive Producer) Ken Tripp (Executive Producer) C Bryan Jones (Executive Producer) Patrick Devlin (Associate Producer) Kay Shaw (Associate Producer) Kit Loffstadt (Associate Producer) Richard Marquez (Production Manager) Brandon-Shea Mutala (Patreon Manager)  

Send us your feedback! 
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Apr 3, 2017

TNG Season 6 - Essential Trek Philosophy.  

In this episode of Meta Treks, hosts Mike Morrison and Zachary Fruhling compare their top picks for Essential Trek Philosophy from season 6 of Star Trek: The Next Generation. From Cartesian skepticism of the external world in "Ship in a Bottle" to transporter-related issues of personal identity in "Second Chances," season 6 of Star Trek: The Next Generation contains some of the most well-known and often-cited philosophical episodes in all of Star Trek. Most importantly, though, find out whether Lieutenant Worf drinks the Romulan hemlock for corrupting the minds of the youth in "Birthright, Part II."

Chapters 
Welcome to Episode 64 and Essential TNG Season 6 (00:01:07) 
Dedication to Beth Ann Allen (00:06:17) 
Time's Arrow (00:07:21) 
Man of the People (00:13:38) 
Rascals (00:17:28) 
Tapestry (00:22:31) 
Ship in a Bottle (00:34:09) 
Frame of Mind (00:35:10) 
Birthright (00:39:16) 
Rightful Heir (00:48:47) 
Second Chances (00:53:46) 
Quality of Life (00:58:20) 
Final Thoughts (01:01:08)  

Hosts 
Mike Morrison and Zachary Fruhling  

Production 
Mike Morrison (Editor) Zachary Fruhling (Producer) Matthew Rushing (Executive Producer) Ken Tripp (Executive Producer) C Bryan Jones (Executive Producer) Patrick Devlin (Associate Producer) Kay Shaw (Associate Producer) Kit Loffstadt (Associate Producer) Richard Marquez (Production Manager) Brandon-Shea Mutala (Patreon Manager)  

Send us your feedback! 
Twitter: @trekfm 
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Contact Form: http://www.trek.fm/contact 
Visit the Trek.fm website at http://www.trek.fm/ 
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Support the Network! 
Become a Trek.fm Patron on Patreon and help us keep Star Trek talk coming every week. We have great perks for you at http://patreon.com/trekfm

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